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Government to launch an online mineral licensing system

By Benjamin Mukose

In a bid to improve efficiency, transparency and investment in the minerals sector in Uganda, the Ministry of Energy & Mineral Development is in the final stages of developing an online mineral licensing system. The Infrastructure Magazine understands that the system developed by Trimble,  an American company with a global footprint, will be launched in August.

The New Jinja Bridge: An engineering ace

The new cable stayed bridge built at the source of the Nile in Jinja is finally complete and launched, amidst excitement among Ugandans. Launching the dam President Museveni underscored the fact that road transport carries about 90 per cent of Uganda’s goods and passenger traffic. "With the new improved bridge, with dual carriage way, it would significantly improve road safety in the country. ” he said.

Gulu to get logistics hub

Plans are in advanced stages to build and set up a logistics hub in Gulu town to service trade and business in northern Uganda, South Sudan and the eastern parts of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Trademark East Africa (TMEA) a donor-funded facility to promote trade among East African states said recently that they had secured US$8.6 million from the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) and the European Union, for the purpose.

Jambojet comes to Entebbe

Low cost airline, Jambojet has started flights to Entebbe. The airline started operating two flights daily  between Entebbe and Nairobi (Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in February. It departs for Entebbe from Jomo Kenyatta at 09:10am and 17:30pm respectively. They also have two flights from Entebbe International airport for Nairobi at 11.00am and 19:20pm daily.

Road accidents: Blame road designers, not drivers, says new Report

Every time an accident happens on our roads, traffic police are quick to blame over-speeding, drink driving, reckless driving or carelessness on the part of the pedestrian/cyclist. That is, blame is always placed on human error. Now, a new report says humans make mistakes anyway, and so authorities need to move away from apportioning blame to the road users, and shifting it to the road makers-city planners and road designers. It argues further that if countries make this paradigm shift, road accidents will be considerably reduced.