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EU commits to finance re-opening of Tororo-Gulu railway line

The European Union has signed a financing agreement with the government of Uganda which will see the repair and re-opening of the old Tororo-Gulu metre gauge railway (MGR) line in the next four years. Once complete, the works will add some 400 km of the functional railway line to the national network. It will be managed by the renascent Uganda Railways Corporation.

The New Jinja Bridge: An engineering ace

The new cable stayed bridge built at the source of the Nile in Jinja is finally complete and launched, amidst excitement among Ugandans. Launching the dam President Museveni underscored the fact that road transport carries about 90 per cent of Uganda’s goods and passenger traffic. "With the new improved bridge, with dual carriage way, it would significantly improve road safety in the country. ” he said.

Which business model?

Over the past few months, there has been an impassioned public discussion around the revival of the Uganda Airlines. The avid debates have centred on: Whether Uganda should revive the airline in the very first place; whether the country has the capacity to run an airline or not; and whether with the ostensibly high levels of corruption in the country, the airline will survive or will just sink tax players’ money into some dark abyss.   

The new Uganda Airlines takes shape

By Benjamin Mukose

What started as a pipe dream some years ago is slowly coming to reality. The idea of reviving Uganda Airlines has over the last few months picked pace and gained momentum with all the key requirements seemingly falling in place. Monica Ntege Azuba, the Works & Transport minister, has said the revived airline is expected to make its first flight by December this year.  

Uganda’s ‘Silk Road’

By Daniel Otto

Although Zhang Qian died over 2000 years ago, he remains famous in China. An adventurous imperial diplomat and envoy, Zhang is remembered for charting routes and traversing central Asia thereby opening China to the outside world.

Zhang’s exploits established a network of routes that eventually linked China to central Asia, the Arab world, Europe and Africa. Through these craggy routes, China started to trade with the rest of the world. Named after silk, China’s biggest export at the time, that road network was later dubbed the “Silk Road”.

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