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URA Tower graces Kampala skyline

The 22-floor office space for the Uganda Revenue Authority is the latest picturesque piece of real estate to grace Kampala’s skyline.   The ultra-modern office block is armed with a modern intelligent building management system that automatically controls facilities like energy, making it an energy efficient (a green) building).  

The New Jinja Bridge: An engineering ace

The new cable stayed bridge built at the source of the Nile in Jinja is finally complete and launched, amidst excitement among Ugandans. Launching the dam President Museveni underscored the fact that road transport carries about 90 per cent of Uganda’s goods and passenger traffic. "With the new improved bridge, with dual carriage way, it would significantly improve road safety in the country. ” he said.

Dangote effect: Kenya, Tanzania enjoy better cement prices than Uganda

By Roger Kyazze

While Ugandans continue to choke on high prices of cement, their Kenyan and Tanzanian counter-parts are enjoying relatively cheaper and more stable prices. The market instability in the Ugandan market recently led to panic buying, hoarding and creation of an artificial cement crisis resulting into the recent skyrocketing of prices.

Uganda now signs agreement to develop oil refinery

By Jacob Okwii.

In what can be seen as a major turn towards oil production, the government of Uganda has signed an agreement with a consortium that will fund and develop the country’s oil refinery. This is one of the two major upstream oil activities the country has been pursuing in its long drawn oil exploration history. The other is the construction of the pipeline to take crude to the coast for export.  

Uganda’s ‘Silk Road’

By Daniel Otto

Although Zhang Qian died over 2000 years ago, he remains famous in China. An adventurous imperial diplomat and envoy, Zhang is remembered for charting routes and traversing central Asia thereby opening China to the outside world.

Zhang’s exploits established a network of routes that eventually linked China to central Asia, the Arab world, Europe and Africa. Through these craggy routes, China started to trade with the rest of the world. Named after silk, China’s biggest export at the time, that road network was later dubbed the “Silk Road”.

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